Choosing an ISP: 4 Critical Factors to Put in Mind

Using the Computer

Using the ComputerInternet service providers, commonly known as ISPs, are crucial IT infrastructure partners that support many companies’ commerce, Internet connectivity, email communication, and overall success of the business.

However, when contemplating which ISP to engage, the price is not the only factor to consider. Keep in mind these primary factors when choosing the right ISP for your business.

Up-Time

Uptime commitment is vital. From the second the ISPs icloud login systems fail, your business will be affected. Thus, select service level agreements that offer real and measurable uptime targets, not just their 99.9 operational promises. Ask what happens when their service fails, and whether they provide 24/7 support, and ensure these assurances are provided in writing.

Downstream Speeds

Clients rate ISPs depending on their downstream speeds. An ISP may advertise its service speed as 15Mbps, but you need to test these claims. If you can, test the downstream speeds of all circuits the day they are installed, and then regularly after that. If possible, speak to other businesses that use the same ISP and find out if they are satisfied with their services.

Upstream Capacity

Test the upstream speeds also. The increase in the popularity of automated off-site backups, VPNs, and remote access often take a toll on an ISP’s upstream capacities. Since organizations need to provide increasing amounts of data to off-site cloud services and mobile users in the field, the capacity of the upstream bandwidth will only grow in importance.

Technical and Field Support

In the case of failure, especially when you are using a VSAT system, how quickly does the ISP resolve the problem? Is their support responsive and accessible? If you are running your business 24/7, then a 9am-5pm technical support from the ISP won’t be useful to your business. Thus, ensure you know the response policy of the ISP before you sign the contract.

Selecting an ISP is more than the money involved. Consider the downstream and upstream speeds, uptime commitments, and availability of support to ensure that your business does not come to a standstill because of Internet failure.